CantoMundo 2020 Guzman Mendoza/Paredez Graduate Fellow Residency opens January 3. 

CantoMundo Applications opened October 1 and ended December 29 Arizona time. 

Go to our website and sign up for our newsletter for all deadlines! 

Poetry Center Student Contests will open in Spring 2020. 


Please note that registration for all Spring 2020 University of Arizona Poetry Center Classes and Workshops opened September December 6, 2019 at 11:00 AM. Registration remains open for each class until it fills.

If the class that interests you does not appear below, it is because the class is fully enrolled. You may be added to a waitlist for the class by emailing the Patri Hadad, the Events Program Coordinator, at patri@email.arizona.edu

For more details on the Classes & Workshops program and the classes this fall, please visit the Classes and Workshops Current Offerings page of the University of Arizona Poetry Center web site.

Please visit our Registration page to learn about cancellations and refund policies. 

Tuesdays: March 17, March 24, March 31 and April 7 from 6:00PM to 8:00PM

Meetings will be in the Poetry Center Alumni Room 205. 

Myths house shared national and cultural narratives and symbols that writers have long mined for material. In the poetry of revisionist mythmaking, poets recast the received plot in order to tell a new story. In this course, we will seek to understand this major mode of cultural critique and encoded expression, mythopoesis, which poets employ to transform culture by changing the stories we tell about ourselves. In four two hour sessions, we’ll discuss samples of poetry written in that mode (for example, Elizabeth Bishop, Anne Sexton, Anne Carson, Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Jerome Rothenberg, Nathaniel Mackey, and Eleanor Wilner). We’ll discuss different types of mythopoesis, and consider how poets approach their subjects, address their concerns, and make their poems. Out of our readings, class members will be invited to generate writing that we share each week. This course will be designed to offer a forum for participants to deepen their own generative processes in dialogue with the works we’re reading—and writing—together. The class may include some workshop type feedback if time allows.

Wednesdays: March 18 & 25, April 1 & 8 2020: 6-8pm

Registration for this class opens December 6, 2019.

Meetings will be in the Poetry Center Alumni Room 205. 

There’s a sense some of us have that our writing could be more than an art form but a way of life. This is actually confirmed by the tradition of the essay, where Montaigne begins by asking himself, “What do I know?” and that spirit of radical self-inquiry extends to the present day, with Megan Boyle kicking off Liveblog nearly 500 years later as such a project: “A FUNCTIONAL THING THAT WILL HOPEFULLY HELP ME FEEL MORE LIKE IMPROVING MYSELF.” Reversing the old cliché of the “struggling artist,” this course attempts to put forward a method for writing, essays in particular, that serves the dual purpose of helping us to be better on the page and off.

Since we’ll be approaching this as daily practice, the only requirement is that we show up with some sort of regular writing discipline, or at least a strong commitment to starting one. Some of the techniques we can expect to cover: making the ordinary extraordinary (Defamiliarization), accepting inner conflict (Negative Capability), taking control over our life story (Rescripting), putting ourselves in other people’s shoes (Magic If). In addition, students can expect to come away with a daily regimen for making these habits of mind, and some understanding of the latest research on writing and well-being. Along the way, we’ll be acquiring a host of literary models, and a few people in our lives to call “our readers.” If Zen master Suzuki is any indication, with any luck we’ll end off better than we started. “Each of you is perfect just the way you are,” he says. “And you can use a little improvement.”

Saturday: February 15, 2020: 10:30am-12:30pm

Meetings will be in the Poetry Center Alumni Room 205. 

When writing about a difficult history, resilience becomes part of the creative process. Reclaiming a narrative, in many ways, is critical to the spirit of a poem––especially if that history has been marginalized, erased, or silenced. The poem becomes a space for us to persist. In this master class, we will do close readings of poems that activate imagery, tone, and repetition. There will be discussion and generative writing.

 Wednesday: February 12, 2020: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM  

Meetings will be in the Poetry Center Alumni Room 205. 


When writing about a difficult history, resilience becomes part of the creative process. Reclaiming a narrative, in many ways, is critical to the spirit of a poem––especially if that history has been marginalized, erased, or silenced. The poem becomes a space for us to persist. In this master class, we will do close readings of poems that activate imagery, tone, and repetition. There will be discussion and generative writing.

University of Arizona Poetry Center